Snoring Tongue Surgery

INTRODUCTION:

Snoring Tongue Surgery involves a procedure called Tongue Channelling in which a Coblation wand creates channels of cauterized tissue within the tongue. Healing of this tissue causes the tongue to shrink making more room for breathing.

REASONS FOR SURGERY:

Dr Wallace recommends Tongue Channelling for patients who have some or all of the following:

  • Excessive bulk of the tongue base
  • Short jaw bone with backward displacement of the tongue base
  • Snoring
  • Obstructive sleep apnoea

RISKS OF SURGERY:

This surgery is associated with a low risk of complication. The specific risks of Tongue Channelling of which you should be aware are:

  • Bleeding is very rarely a problem and would be dealt with during the surgery
  • Infection is rare during recovery but would be evident with pain and fever
  • Obstructive swelling is rare and would be detected and treated during overnight post-op observation

ANAESTHESIA:

This procedure is done under General Anaesthesia and takes approximately 20 minutes and is usually part of a Combined procedure.

THE OPERATION:

The procedure is done with a Coblation wand (cautery within a stream of saline) introduced at 3 or more puncture points down the centre of the tongue and along each side.

FOLLOW UP CARE:

Tongue pain is usually mild to moderate but settles quickly over a few days. The puncture points may be raw and sensitive also for a few days.

COMBINED OPERATIONS:

Tongue Channelling is commonly combined with Palate surgery for snoring and sleep apnoea.

RESULTS:

The results of Tongue Channelling are seen 2 to 3 months after surgery